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1.
Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report, Volume I + Supplemental Materials. Columbia Accident Investigation Board, National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: GPO, 2003. Wraps. 261 pages + CDROM, wraps, volume 1 only of the 6-volume set, color illustrations, figures, endnotes, appendices, usual library markings, covers somewhat soiled.
[Book #52301]
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Price: $50.00
2.
America in Space: A Pictorial Review. NASA EP-14 Rev. 5-64. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, 1964. Revised Edition. 72, wraps, illustrations, covers somewhat worn and soiled, some soiling at page edges.
[Book #40058]
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Price: $40.50
3.
Apollo 11 Bootprint; NL-2009-06-017-HQ Image dated 7/20/1969. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2009. Part of Apollo 40 years series. Photograph. Format approximately 8.5 inches by 11 inches. Image size is approximately 6 inches by 7.25 inches. The caption reads: One of the first steps taken on the Moon, this is an image of Buzz Aldrin's bootprint from the Apollo 11 mission. Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the Moon on July 20, 1969. Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that landed the first two humans on the Moon. Mission commander Neil Armstrong and pilot Buzz Aldrin landed the lunar module Eagle on July 20, 1969. Armstrong became the first to step onto the lunar surface six hours after landing; Aldrin joined him about 20 minutes later. They collected 47.5 pounds of lunar material to bring back to Earth. Armstrong and Aldrin spent just under a day on the lunar surface before rejoining Columbia in lunar orbit. After being sent toward the Moon by the Saturn V's upper stage, the astronauts separated the spacecraft from it and traveled for three days until they entered into lunar orbit. Armstrong and Aldrin then moved into the lunar module Eagle and landed in the Sea of Tranquility. They stayed a total of about 21.5 hours on the lunar surface. The astronauts used Eagle's upper stage to lift off from the lunar surface and rejoin Collins in the command module. They returned to Earth and landed in the Pacific Ocean on July 24. Apollo 11 effectively ended the Space Race and fulfilled a national goal proposed in 1961 by U.S. President John F. Kennedy: "before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth."
[Book #74052]
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Price: $25.00
4.
Apollo 11 Lunar Landing Mission Press Kit. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Place_Pub: Washington, DC: NASA, 1969. Quarto, 250, wraps, illus., diagrams, staple bound in top corner (small tears around staple in front cover--cover barely attached).
[Book #53381]
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Price: $600.00
5.
Apollo 12; Preliminary Science Report, NASA SP-235. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 1970. Presumed First Edition, First printing. Wraps. xii, 237, [1] pages. Glossary of Terms. Acronyms. Ex-library with usual markings. Cover worn. Front edge had become wet and some minor page sticking, especially at lower bottom corner, noted. Some minor page sticking without loss of text. Label on back cover. Some page staining and soiling, mostly at margins. Our second journey to the Moon opened the new age of extraterrestrial scientific exploration by man. Apollo 12 concentrated on a systematic scientific sampling designed to help unlock some of the secrets of the solar system's origin and early history. At Apollo 12’s destination we had in the spring of 1967 landed Surveyor 3, a spiderlike mechanical creature with three legs, a clawlike arm, and a roving TV eye. This document relates the preliminary scientific observations resulting from the mission of Apollo 12. The first of a series of missions designed for the systematic exploration of the Moon was successfully accomplished on Apollo 12. The Apollo 12 astronauts achieved a pinpoint landing at a preselected site, and then spent an extended time on the lunar surface. This illustrates the rapid progress of the Apollo program. The precise landing capability allowed the crew to accomplish a wide variety of preplanned tasks and paved the way for planning future missions to landing areas with the possibility of significant scientific returns. By changing the orbital plane of the command and service module (CSM) twice, once for rendezvous and once to accomplish photographic tasks, the crew demonstrated the capability to explore new areas of the lunar surface during orbital operations.
[Book #74057]
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Price: $100.00
6.
Apollo 13 Spacecraft Splashdown in the Pacific; NL-2009-06-015-HQ Image dated 4/17/1970. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2009. Part of Apollo 40 years series. Photograph. Format approximately 8.5 inches by 11 inches. Image size is approximately 6 inches by 7.25 inches. The caption reads: The Apollo 13 Command Module splashed down in the South Pacific at 12:07:44 p.m. on April 17, 1970, after a harrowing mission in which a ruptured oxygen tank put the crew in peril. The red and white parachutes were the first signal to Mission Control that astronauts Lovell, Haise, and Swigert had defied the odds and made it safely back to Earth. Apollo 13 was the seventh manned mission in the Apollo space program and the third intended to land on the Moon. The craft was launched on April 11, 1970 from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, but the lunar landing was aborted after an oxygen tank exploded two days later, crippling the Service Module upon which the Command Module had depended. Despite great hardship caused by limited power, loss of cabin heat, shortage of potable water, and the critical need to make makeshift repairs to the carbon dioxide removal system, the crew returned safely to Earth on April 17, 1970, six days after launch. The mission was commanded by James A. Lovell with John L. "Jack" Swigert as Command Module Pilot and Fred W. Haise as Lunar Module Pilot. Swigert was a late replacement for the original CM pilot Ken Mattingly, who was grounded by the flight surgeon after exposure to German measles.
[Book #74050]
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Price: $25.00
7.
Apollo 30th Anniversary Medallion. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, c. 1999? 1 medallion, Medallion commemorating the 30th anniversary of the Apollo program.
[Book #50865]
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Price: $45.00
8.
Astro: Exploring the Invisible Universe of Ultraviolet and X-Ray Astronomy. NP 121. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, c. 1987. 40, wraps, illus.
[Book #40411]
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Price: $33.75
9.
Astronaut John H. Glenn Orbits the Earth for America, February 20, 1962. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: GPO, 1962. 10.25" x 7.5", 10, wraps, profusely illus., some soiling to rear cover, top corner rear cover bent.
[Book #38405]
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Price: $54.00
10.
Atmospheric Aerosols: Their Optical Properties and Effects. A Digest of Technical Papers... NASA CP-2004. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, 1976. 306, wraps, illus., references, covers somewhat worn and soiled, spine somewhat wrinkled.
[Book #40749]
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Price: $90.00
11.
The Best We Can Be. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: GPO, 1989. First? Edition. First? Printing. 24, wraps.
[Book #40375]
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Price: $31.50
12.
Beyond Einstein; From the Big Bang to Black Holes. NP-2006-11-801-GSFC. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2007. Third Printing [stated]. Wraps. 12 pages plus covers. Illustrations (color). Sources of Further Information. How did the Universe begin? Does time have a beginning and an end? Does space have edges? Einstein's theory of relativity replied to these ancient questions with three startling predictions: that the Universe is expanding from a Big Bang; that black holes so distort space and time that time stops at their edges; and that a dark energy could be pulling space apart, sending galaxies forever beyond the edge of the visible Universe. Observations confirm these remarkable predictions, the last finding only four years ago. Yet Einstein's legacy is incomplete. His theory raises – but cannot answer – three profound questions: What powered the Big Bang? What happens to space, time and matter at the edge of a black hole? and, What is the mysterious dark energy pulling the Universe apart? The Beyond Einstein program within NASA's office of space science aims to answer these questions, employing a series of missions linked by powerful new technologies and complementary approaches to shared science goals. The program also serves as a potent force with which to enhance science education and science literacy.
[Book #75464]
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Price: $20.00
13.
Celebrate Apollo: Exploring the Moon, Discovering Earth. 40th Anniversary. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Place_Pub: Washington, DC: NASA, 2009. Quarto, 15, color illus., small creases in folder pockets, creases at folder spine.
[Book #52713]
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Price: $35.00
14.
Cernan Salutes Flag; NL-2009-06-018- HQ Image dated 12/13/1972. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2009. Part of Apollo 40 years series. Photograph. Format approximately 8.5 inches by 11 inches. Image size is approximately 6 inches by 7.25 inches. The caption reads: Eugene A. Cernan, Commander, Apollo 17, salutes the flag on the lunar surface during extravehicular activity (EVA) on NASA's final lunar landing mission. The Lunar Module Challenger is in the left background behind the flag, and the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is also in the background behind him. Apollo 17 was the final mission of NASA's Apollo program. Launched on December 7, 1972, with a crew made up of Commander Eugene Cernan, Command Module Pilot Ronald Evans, and Lunar Module Pilot Harrison Schmitt. Apollo 17 was the first night launch of a U.S. human spaceflight and the final manned launch of a Saturn V rocket. While Evans remained in lunar orbit in the Command/Service Module, Cernan and Schmitt spent just over three days on the moon in the Taurus–Littrow valley and completed three moonwalks, taking lunar samples and deploying scientific instruments. The landing site was chosen with the primary objectives of Apollo 17 in mind: to sample lunar highland material older than the impact that formed Mare Imbrium, and investigate the possibility of relatively new volcanic activity in the same area. Cernan, Evans and Schmitt returned to Earth on December 19 after a 12-day mission. Apollo 17 is the most recent manned Moon landing and was the last time humans travelled beyond low Earth orbit. The mission broke several records: the longest moon landing, longest total extravehicular activities (moonwalks), largest lunar sample, and longest time in lunar orbit.
[Book #74053]
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Price: $25.00
15.
Dr. Ronald A. Parise--Payload Specialist. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, c. 1986. 8" x 10", 1 color photo, 1 color photograph with explanatory information about NASA's Astro Observatory on the back.
[Book #50287]
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Price: $15.00
16.
Earth Observing System Reports, Volume IIf: Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Instrument Panel Report. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, 1987. Presumed First Edition, First printing thus. Wraps. Quarto, 233 pages. Wraps. Illustrations (some in color). Tables. Charts. Appendices. References. Glossary. Some wear to cover and spine edges.
[Book #11742]
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Price: $30.00
17.
The Earth-Orbiting Flight of Astronaut Carpenter: 3 Dawns and 3 Dusks in 4 Hours and 53 Minutes in Aurora 7, May 24, 1962. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: GPO, 1962. 10.25" x 7.5", 6, wraps, profusely illus., small creases in margins, slight wear to covers.
[Book #38406]
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Price: $54.00
18.
Earthwise--Apollo 8; NL-2009-06-016-HQ Image dated 12/29/1968. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2009. Part of Apollo 40 years series. Photograph. Format approximately 8.5 inches by 11 inches. Image size is approximately 6 inches by 7.25 inches. The caption reads: This view of the rising Earth greeted the Apollo 8 astronauts as they came from behind the Moon after the lunar orbit insertion burn. The photo is displayed here in its original orientation, thought it is more commonly viewed with the lunar surface at the bottom of the photo. In the image is the following quotation from Astronaut William Anders "We came all this way to explore the Moon, and the most important thing is that we discovered the Earth." Apollo 8, the second manned spaceflight mission in the United States Apollo space program, was launched on December 21, 1968, and became the first manned spacecraft to leave Earth orbit, reach the Earth's Moon, orbit it and return safely to Earth. The three-astronaut crew — Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot James Lovell, and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders — became the first humans to: travel beyond low Earth orbit; escape Earth's gravity; see Earth as a whole planet; enter the gravity well of another celestial body (Earth's moon); orbit another celestial body (Earth's moon); directly see the far side of the Moon with their own eyes; witness an Earthrise; escape the gravity of another celestial body (Earth's moon); and re-enter the gravitational well of Earth. The crew was named Time magazine's "Men of the Year" for 1968 upon their return.
[Book #74051]
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Price: $25.00
19.
Effects of Chlorofluoromethanes on Stratospheric Ozone: Assessment Report. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, 1977. Quarto, 12, wraps, 1 staple in upper side margin, discoloration to covers.
[Book #16057]
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Price: $31.50
20.
The Einstein Probes. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington DC: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Presumed First Edition, First printing. Pamphlet. 4 pages. Illustrations (color). Format is approximately 8.5 inches by 11 inches. This discussed the Joint Dark Energy Mission, the Einstein Black Hole Finder, and the Einstein Inflation Probe,
[Book #75465]
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Price: $10.00
21.
Flight Patch Decal: Engle, Covey, Lounge, Fisher, Van Hoften. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, n.d. 3.5" diameter, 1 decal, color decal, some soiling to decal backing.
[Book #14210]
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Price: $13.50
22.
Flight Patch Decal: OPF Power Up, Loud & Proud. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, 1987. 3.5" diameter, 1 decal, color decal, some soiling to decal backing.
[Book #14211]
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Price: $13.50
23.
Flight Patch Decal: STS 51-G. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: NASA, n.d. 3.5" diameter, 1 decal, color decal, some soiling to decal backing.
[Book #14209]
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Price: $13.50
24.
A Forecast of Space Technology, 1980-2000. NASA SP-387. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: GPO, 1976. Quarto, approx. 300, wraps, figures, tables, references, small stains to fore-edge & in lower margin, covers somewhat soiled, small tears at spine.
[Book #12277]
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Price: $40.50
25.
Fourth Annual Earth Resources Program Review Presented at the Manned Spacecraft Center Houston, Texas, January 17 to 21, 1972. National Aeronautics, Space Administration.
Washington, DC: GPO, 1972. Approx. 1500, wraps, 5-volume set, illus. (some color), diagrams, maps, covers somewhat worn and soiled, some spine rippling.
[Book #40444]
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Price: $2,250.00


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